Vagina surgery in young girls linked to porn

A leading adolescent gynaecologist, Dr N. Crouch, has said that girls as young as nine are seeking genital surgery because they are distressed by its appearance.

In 2015-16, more than 200 girls under 18 had labiaplasty on the NHS. More than 150 of the girls were under 15.

But… Why? What are these young girls comparing themselves to? Who is telling them their vagina isn’t good enough, long enough, neat enough, small enough…?

One 14 year old girl who seriously considered labiaplasty made the connection with pornography. She said,

“People around me were watching porn and I just had this idea that it should be symmetrical and not sticking out. I thought that was what everyone else looked like, because I hadn’t seen any normal everyday images before then.”

Young men and women are comparing themselves to what they see in pornography. The consumption of pornography is so high that vaginas in pornography are seen as “normal.”

Paquita de Zulueta, a GP of 30 years, blames the unrealistic images girls are being exposed to through pornography and social media. The reality is, vaginas come in all shapes and sizes and, according to Zulueta, labiaplasty should only be given to girls who are experiencing medical issues. To hear a girl speaking about any part of her body using comments such as “I just hate it, I just want it removed” is heartbreaking.

I was shocked recently when chatting with some female friends (in their late 20’s) to find that many women didn’t even know what certain parts of their vagina were called. Nobody had taught them about their vagina or sexual pleasure but they had picked up the message that it should always be kept neat and tidy because “nobody likes a natural vagina.”

Something has to change.

As an organisation that is committed to opening eyes and freeing lives from the damaging impact of porn, we see firsthand the damage that porn is doing to mental health, relationships and society. We are glad that people are waking up and realising that pornography is not just harmless fun and a natural part of exploring sexuality. Porn is teaching young people and adults a new “norm” and it is harmful not just to their minds but, clearly, to their physical bodies. Pornography is shaping the mindset, standards and expectations of a generation and that is dangerous.

Parents, talk to your children.

Youth workers, listen to your youth groups.

Teachers, educate your pupils.

Leaders, empower your churches and communities.

Conversation and education are the main weapons in this battle against pornography. 

You can read the original BBC article here.

By |2017-07-06T13:24:12+00:00July 6th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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